Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Integrating Media/Alternative Methods

Our new printmakers began their journey into Intaglio last evening with most having plates filed and grounded by the end of the evening. Each is exploring a different theme that they will develop and evolve through the different processes they will be exploring during the semester. I'll have some new images from them to post soon.


The old guard is exploring some new approaches to their work this semester and some of the results are pretty interesting.  Alex has a box of broken glass that resemble diamonds, and, of course, I'm always a sucker for things that sparkle. He's placing them directly onto the exposure unit and then placing a photopolymer plate on top. The results are beautiful surfaces of texture that he will continue to explore and incorporate into other images, possible linking that with some of his body impressions.


Anna is working on some new ideas by creating textural surfaces that she will be cutting and mounting onto various sized wooden cubes. The image above was created by applying gesso to a canvas board and marking into the surface while it was wet. Some of that inspiration may come from the work of Yaacov Agam, where the artwork can be touched, moved, and manipulated by the viewer. It will be a challenging process.


Dani is continuing her work with the monotype process exploring identity issues through aggressive and uncomfortable images of emotional responses. Working in very transparent layers, she builds the images into psychological narratives of considerable strength.


Stasha is still searching out her vision through experimentations with mixed media, such as water and graphite powder, tusche, and color printing. Not sure yet where she will be taking this research, but as the scale increases and movement becomes less confined, her discoveries will be engaging.


Wende is a printing machine. She has several large matricies created as collagraphs that she's processing as as intaglio, some following with surface rolls, and some just printed as reliefs. They are printed in various combinations, looking for uniquely personal patterns that she will incorporate into various quilted images.

Laura is working an a relief print. I couldn't include an image today as there were no proofs available to shoot. I'll catch one on the next go-around. 

11 comments:

brian h. jones said...

Hello....is anybody out there.....I mean, really....is there anyone out there?

wcudmore said...

I am here master. I love that everyone seems to be working at finding their pathways through printmaking. I feel and have learned that the more you push yourself out of the little square box the more you learn about yourself and where you want printmaking to lead you or you lead it. Don't be afraid to try something new...if it doesn't work go back and do it again till it does. Happy printing everyone.

Dani said...

You Echoed? I have enjoyed seeing students of all levels trying new techniques even if it turns out like crap or if it turns into a masterpiece. The willingness to explore other techniques to printmaking will also benefit in other studios. I am looking forward to seeing more invented ways to produce art.

astotts said...

I really do think that last critique was very informative. It has opened my mind to try and find reasons for doing what I do. Being a male surrounded by females really has opened the box of things that I can get away with that women could not (like taking my shirt of in public). Most of the work created by the rest of the class is more delicate and pretty (or feminine?)in a way. Wende's work for sure has feminine qualities. And, even Dani's work, telling the story that it does, still deals with issues more common for women to be found in, therefore giving it that certain femaleness that my work will never contain. My work on the other hand comes off as more naturally masculine and grotesque. I can't help to think that it may be due to the fact that my experimental techniques usually allow me to come up with something more spontaneous and less planned. Which, from my personal experience, is a more masculine trait I would say. Basically, I see everyone in class working very (up)tightly on something making sure to glitter up every tiny detail. I feel more open to letting what happens happen, and accept failures if they happen. I think that by performing some of the actions I have been doing to create these recent images, the audience will gain more from the "experience" my art as a whole has to offer. That experience is something I think is somewhat spoken through the work already, so why not take it further, and add smell?.....

wcudmore said...

Hummmm...Alex, I wonder how the rest of the females in our class will feel about your "feministic" comments about their work as being "delicate and pretty". I will speak only on my own thoughts. You are correct in saying that you are the only one that can get away with taking your shirt off in class. If I was to take my shirt off in class what would it be considered? Brazen, bold, told I can't do that at school? Why...because I am a female?My work does have a strong feminine quality to it...strong traditional quality...as well. However, there are male artist that are doing and have done quilting, tapestries, wall hangings...are they considered feminine artists or masculine artists?Two male artists come to mind...El Anatsui and Arturo Alonzo Sandoval. I have found in my research...that in America's past the women have been known to do quilting, sewing etc. In many countries though, men do the quilting, weaving, not the women. trust me, I have done alot of experimenting with my veggie pressing, and printmaking and continue to be amazed at what there is out there to continue to experience successes and failures in these areas and beyond. I might add that stories like Dani's...happen to males as well as females. I do think that women are more willing to speak out about these problems,than men, because of the masculine thing.That being said, Alex ...I love what you are doing in class and watching your energy soar is super great and contagious. you are a printmaker...we are printmakers and are addicted to the processes of printmaking. I think you and I might need to talk a little more about the feminine/masculine thing...ha. I have worked on cars, mowed lawns and played both mom and dad...not sure what that makes me...hehe. Loved your comment...it got me all fired up! See ya Monday!

astotts said...

I knew that this comment would be taken this way. I am not saying that there is anything wrong with work being delicate and pretty. I actually really like what all my fellow students are making. I am just saying that if a female and myself were walking down the street with our shirts off, that I would be less punished for the action of indecent exposure. Is this right? Should a male be less punished for the same act? What is one nipple from another? All I was trying to say was that I feel that my work looks like it has been created by a male, where the females work looks like it has been created by a female. If a female were to use their body like I do, it obviously would not look anything like my body.It may just be me who feels this way, but I believe it to be true. A lot of the comments last posted are from my personal experiences with the women in my life, and may not be true for all women... But I don't know all women. Sure there are men who make quilts and sew, heck I sewed a tie, and also enjoy paper making. Which apparently is a more feminine trade? I am not afraid to express my feminine side when it comes down to it. I brought up Dani's story because it really does spark an interest to me, one because I am a bit unsure of the situation as a whole, and as a male, honestly, I feel a bit confused about how i should respond to such a sensitive subject. I know enough details to understand the series, but I am sure that she would feel more comfortable expressing her feeling to another female than me. Sure the same types of things happen to all sorts of people all over the world. It may just be a matter of females being able to express themselves more about the topic, but then again doesn't that go back to an issue of males and females and the way they express their emotions? I don't want to come off as some macho dude who only likes work made by men. Women are just as capable, or even more capable than men in my opinion. I know that I will never be nearly as good as Wende at making paper or sewing or anything that you do. and, I know that Dani can monotype my cheeks right to a litho stone with anything that she does. But all in all, I do what I do, and I have to appeal to a whole group of women, who no matter what, will never quite understand being a man. Just as I will never be able to understand how to be a woman. And I think that this fact has nudged me a bit in the direction I am going. Flip the class to all males with one female. How would the females respond?

astotts said...

Is it not the body that classifies men as men, and women as women the most?

wcudmore said...

Excellent points and rebutal Alex! I pretty much knew that is what you did not mean in your first comment, only because I work with you all week and have gotton to know you. So I just put it out there as if I did not know you...
Your points are much clearer in your second comment and I totally agree with you!
Interesting point of view and observation on your part and I am glad you are bringing this out in your work. It does show your senitivity towards women. I think you you could even use these thoughts of yours into some kind of performance art...to bring awarness.Like start by useing the last sentence in your comment...flipping the class to all males and 1 female...that would be interesting indeed!Just for the record Alex...I was just playing the devil's advocate. I know some women who would of misunderstood what you where saying. I would never want to be a male for sure.
You are a multi- talented artist Alex, and bring up issues that should be brought up and talked about. Keep doing it! See you Monday!

astotts said...

I knew you didn't mean anything offensive or anything. My research has brought up a lot of questions that i haven't been able to wrap my head around. Like there was a strong feminist movement that was basically proving that women should have equal rights. Has there ever been a masculinist movement? And if there has what would be the difference between that and a feminist movement? If they both are advocating the same issue of equal rights, then essentually they are the same. There are more and more women artists now than ever and the number will most likely continue to grow. I think the main issue of what i am trying to say is that i am me and nothing shows what i have experienced and been through than myself. I appreciate your rebuttal Wende! I think through this blog we can all learn to express our emotions and try and gain knowledge about our own work. And figure out the best ways of communicating our thoughts and context.

wcudmore said...

I agree. I feel that the balance of men and women is off. Not sure what it should be. I do know that we are physically built differently...and we think differently, so being different is normal, right?
I can only go on my own experiences as well, I believe that is what makes us unique human beings and what we create a strong part of self. I am still figuiring out lots of questions I have about myself...

I think that a very crucial part of growing as a artist and human being is facing those fears, investagating those questions and experimenting with success and failures = better human being = better artist. Critques are healthy for us...we may not like what we hear...but it makes us or should make us think.
I think this is a great way for all of us to communitcate our thoughts and help each other.

brian h. jones said...

Now we're blogg'n !!!

This reminds me a little of the kinds of discussions my Women in Art class would get into. There were as many males in the class as females. That was a long time ago, so today the arguments are expressed much differently. In fact, for the most part, the arguments no longer exist. The once established male standards of art no longer apply to both men and women, as they did only a few decades ago. Women's history is quite different than male history. We are very different, indeed, and not just because of the reverberations of removing our shirts in public.